Tuesday, May 29, 2007

Community Futures: The Small Town in the Bioeconomy

Community Futures: The Small Town in the Bioeconomy
April 10, 2007 | Iowa State University, Scheman Building, Ames, Iowa

A one-day conference that explored the impact and implications of the emerging bioeconomy for Iowa's small communities, with a keynote address by Governor Chet Culver. It also featured presentations, panel discussions and breakout sessions with economists, sociologists, designers, extension staff and local officials.

Schedule
9:00 AM,
Welcome
Mark Engelbrecht, Dean, College of Design, Iowa State University
9:10 AM
Opening Remarks
Gregory Geoffroy, President, Iowa State University
9:30 AM
Keynote Address | Leading a 21st Century Iowa Expedition
Chet Culver, Governor, State of Iowa
10:00 AM
Facets of the Bioeconomy Affecting the Small Towns in Iowa
Bruce Babcock, Director, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development, Iowa State University
10:30 AM
The Bioeconomy: Visual Aspects, Quality of Life, and the Rural Landscape
Paul Anderson, Professor, Landscape Architecture and Agronomy, Iowa State University; Julia Badenhope, Associate Professor, Landscape Architecture, Iowa State University; Christopher J. Seeger, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, Landscape Architecture, Iowa State University
11:45 AM LUNCH
12:45 AM
Panel: The Opportunities and Issues of Small-town Life in the Bioeconomy
Jack Payne, Vice President for Extension and Outreach, Iowa State University, Moderator; John Allen, Director, Western Rural Development Center, Utah State University; Robert Gramling, Director, Center for Socioeconomic Research, University of Louisiana at Lafayette; Tom Johnson, Frank Miller Professor of Agricultural Economics and Director, Community Policy Analysis Center, University of Missouri
2:00 PM Breakout Sessions(
Each will have a facilitator, design professional and expert on the individual topic
*Aesthetics and the Landscape
*Economic Development
*The Environment
*Local Government (Taxes and Finance)
*Planning and Land Use
*Transportation and Infrastructure
3:45 pm General Sessions and Report
4:30 pm Adjourn
[http://www.extension.iastate.edu/bioeconomy/communityfutures/Schedule.html]

Speaker Bios
[http://www.extension.iastate.edu/bioeconomy/communityfutures/Speakers.html]

General Sessions Audio/Visual
Conference Welcome and Keynote
***ISU College of Design Dean Mark Engelbrecht
***ISU President Gregory L. Geoffroy,
***The Honorable Chet Culver, Governor of Iowa
[http://connect.extension.iastate.edu/p96713206/]

Facets of the Bioeconomy Affecting the Small Towns in Iowa
***Bruce Babcock, Director, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development, Iowa State University
[http://connect.extension.iastate.edu/p98733408/]

The Bioeconomy: Visual Aspects, Quality of Life, and the Rural Landscape
***Julia Badenhope, Associate Professor, Landscape Architecture, Iowa State University
***Christopher J. Seeger, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, Landscape Architecture, Iowa State University
***Paul Anderson, Professor, Landscape Architecture and Agronomy, Iowa State University
[http://connect.extension.iastate.edu/p36246159/]

The Opportunities and Issues of Small-town Life in the Bioeconomy
***Jack Payne, Vice President for Extension and Outreach, Iowa State University
Moderator
***John Allen, Director, Western Rural Development Center, Utah State University
***Robert Gramling, Director, Center for Socioeconomic Research, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
***Tom Johnson, Frank Miller Professor of Agricultural Economics and Director, Community Policy Analysis Center, University of Missouri
[http://connect.extension.iastate.edu/p49047439/]

Sponsored by Town/Craft: Iowa State University College of Design / Hometown Perry, Iowa / Iowa State University Extension

Source [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/bioeconomy/communityfutures/]

Monday, May 28, 2007

Leopold Center 20th Anniversary Celebration Conference

Leopold Center 20th Anniversary Celebration Conference
Iowa State University | July 10-11 2007

The event will begins July 10 with a selection of five pre-conference tours. Keynote speaker, Mark Ritchie, Minnesota Secretary of State, will open the July 11 conference conversation with keyonote titled "Sustaining Agriculture, Sustaining Democracy." Discussions will continue throughout the day in more than 20 breakout sessions.

The conference will include a mid-day outdoor festival with demonstrations, interactive displays, and a locally sourced meal.

Source [http://www.ucs.iastate.edu/mnet/leopold/home.html]

Pre-conference Tours (July 10 2007)

Participants can register for a wide variety of full day and half day tours. These tours highlight some of the Leopold Center's work throughout Iowa. The full-day tours will depart from the Scheman Building at 7:30 a.m.; cost includes transportation, lunch and afternoon treats. Half-day morning tours will leave at 8:00 a.m. The Half-day afternoon tour leaves at 1:00 pm. Half-Day tours include transportation, water and snacks. Space is limited ... .

***A Look at the Culture in Agri-culture: Tours of the Whiterock Conservancy and The Homestead.
Explore what could become Iowa's largest nature preserve and research center -- more than 5,000 acres of rolling pastures, timbered bluffs and patches of native prairie and oak savannah along the banks of the Middle Raccoon River near Coon Rapids.

***Homemade Pie, Dairy-Fresh Ice Cream... Heaven in Iowa
The Leopold Center has been a key force behind development of a stronger local food economy in northeast Iowa. Last year, 27 institutional food buyers in Black Hawk County purchased $671,000 in local foods from nearby farms and processors. On this tour you will meet the farmers, grocery owners, restaurant managers and processors who are building new economic relationships around local foods.

***Water Quality is Everybody's Job: From Streamside Buffers to Urban Rain Gardens
At the nationally recognized Bear Creek Watershed, you'll see one of the nation's oldest riparian research projects established by the Leopold Center's Agroecology Issue Team in 1990. Mature streamside plantings have transformed the area, adding wildlife habitat, diversity and now a potential source for biomass. In a unique partnership, Iowa State University researchers worked with eight farmland owners to restore both sides of Bear Creek.

***Biomass for Biofutures - Homegrown Industry for Iowa?
A morning tour [that] includes a visit to the Biomass Energy Conversion Center (BECON) in Nevada [Iowa] followed by a field crop walk. At BECON [vistors] ... will see and learn about new technologies for products and processes beyond corn ethanol and learn about key biomass issues that influence Iowa's bioeconomy choices. Following ... [visit], attendees will take ... a walking tour of possible future biomass crops, ... viewing ... plots with different kinds of crops that may form the backbone of our Iowa biomass future ... .

***Black Soil and Purple Lips: Growing & Enjoying the Fruits of the Land
... [An] afternoon [tour] ... [of] an on-farm viticulture research [facilty] and local organic winery. During the first part of the tour, [visitors] ... will stop at the Iowa State University Horticulture Research Station to see grape cultivar trials and various management techniques ... [and] [t]hen ... travel to a commercial production facility at Prairie Moon Winery [to] ... experience first-hand the production intricacies of a successful vineyard - from soil to bottle.

Source
[http://www.ucs.iastate.edu/mnet/leopold/about.html]
Brochure
[http://www.ucs.iastate.edu/mnet/_repository/2007/leopold/pdf/tours.pdf]

Conference (July 11 2007)
Break-out Sessions
Sessions by Time
Breakout Session 1 (10-11:00 a.m.)
4. Fish Bowl Discussion: On-Farm Energy Conservation
7. Healthy People and Landscapes: Iowa's Future Food System
12. Maintaining the Land's Capacity for Self-Renewal
17. Rethinking Agriculture for Healthier Soil and Water
20. Twenty Years of Organic Agriculture: Sustainable Impacts
22. America's Lost Landscape, the Tallgrass Prairie

Breakout Session 2 (12:30-1:30 p.m.)
2. Ash Recovery: Closing the Loop in Biofuel Production
8. Developing a Vibrant, Sustainable Regional Food System: The Case of Northeast Iowa
11. Building Local Food Networks in Iowa: Progress and Potential
13. Opportunities for Beginning As Well As Begin-Again Farmers
14. Fish Bowl Discussion: Diversification on the Farm, in Rural Communities
18. Rethinking Agriculture for a Living Land
23. Telling the Sustainable Agriculture Story

Breakout Session 3 (1:45-2:45 p.m.)
3. New Cropping Systems for Cellulosic Feedstock Production and Environmental Stewardship
6. Planning an Energy-Efficient Landscape for Iowa: A Systems Approach
9. Fish Bowl Discussion: A Walk Across the Food System
15. No Child Left Inside: Helping the Next Generation Discover a Sense of Place
19. Rethinking Agriculture for Healthier Plants and Animals
21. Learning from the Legacy of Aldo Leopold
22. America's Lost Landscape, the Tallgrass Prairie

Breakout Session 4 (3:30-4:30 p.m.)
1. Harnessing the Wind
5. Create Your Own Virtual Farm for Biomass
10. Food Preparation Demonstration: Iowa Local Foods Show
11. Building Local Food Networks in Iowa: Progress and Potential
16. Policies to Help Farmers Move toward Ecologically Sound, Profitable Farming
23. Telling the Sustainable Agriculture Story

Sessions by Track
The Bioeconomy
1. Harnessing the Wind
2. Ash Recovery: Closing the Loop in Biofuel Production
3. New Cropping Systems for Cellulosic Feedstock Production and Environmental Stewardship
4. Fish Bowl Discussion: On-Farm Energy Conservation
5. Create Your Own Virtual Farm for Biomass
6. Planning an Energy-Efficient Landscape for Iowa: A Systems Approach
Food and Health
7. Healthy People and Landscapes: Iowa's Future Food System
8. Developing a Vibrant, Sustainable Regional Food System: The Case of Northeast Iowa
9. Fish Bowl Discussion: A Walk Across the Food System
10. Food Preparation Demonstration: Iowa Local Foods Show
11. Building Local Food Networks in Iowa: Progress and Potential
People on the Land
12. Maintaining the Land's Capacity for Self-Renewal
13. Opportunities for Beginning As Well As Begin-Again Farmers
14. Fish Bowl Discussion: Diversification on the Farm, in Rural Communities
15. No Child Left Inside: Helping the Next Generation Discover a Sense of Place
16. Policies to Help Farmers Move toward Ecologically Sound, Profitable Farming Natural Resources
17. Rethinking Agriculture for Healthier Soil and Water
18. Rethinking Agriculture for a Living Land
19. Rethinking Agriculture for Healthier Plants and Animals
General
20. Twenty Years of Organic Agriculture: Sustainable Impacts
21. Learning from the Legacy of Aldo Leopold
22. America's Lost Landscape, the Tallgrass Prairie
23. Telling the Sustainable Agriculture Story

Source
[http://www.ucs.iastate.edu/mnet/leopold/moreinfo.html]
Brochure
[http://www.ucs.iastate.edu/mnet/_repository/2007/leopold/pdf/breakout.pdf]

BREAKOUT SESSION DESCRIPTIONS
BIOECONOMY
***1. Harnessing the Wind | 3:30-4:30 p.m.
This energy source is a dependable, safe, efficient, clean and environmentally sound way to meet some of agriculture's needs without adding to greenhouse gas emissions. Bill Haman from the Iowa Energy Center will discuss the latest research in this area.

***2. Ash Recovery: Closing the Loop in Biofuel Production | 12:30-1:30 p.m.
Robert Anex, associate director of the ISU Office of Biorenewables Programs, will provide updates on the latest innovation in biofuel production: returning processed ash to the land. This partial systems approach would recycle nutrients and decrease reliance on other fossil fuel-based inputs.

***3. New Cropping Systems for Cellulosic Feedstock Production and Environmental Stewardship | 1:45-2:45 p.m.
Producing biomass for conversion to liquid fuels and other industrial chemicals may offer economic opportunities for Iowans. However, removal of large quantities of crop materials also creates challenges in protecting the land. Iowa State agronomist Matt Liebman will explain his research on new crops and management systems that addresses these concerns.

***4. Fish Bowl Discussion: On-Farm Energy Conservation | 10:00-11:00 a.m.
Researchers and farmers interacting in a fishbowl discussion format will lead the audience in an engaging overview of Iowa's on-farm energy conservation projects. Dialogue will focus on adaptation and transition as well as the inherent challenges and opportunities of these systems. The audience will be challenged to use this session to rethink their own energy use and discover new ways to address energy consumption.

***5. Create Your Own Virtual Farm for Biomass | 3:30-4:30 p.m.
Learn how to use I-FARM, a free, web-based farm modeling program. I-FARM can predict economic returns and ecosystem impacts of farm operations, while integrating both crop and livestock components. Scenarios for biomass production will be demonstrated.
Rob Anex, ISU Office of Biorenewables Programs; Associate Professor, ISU Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

***6. Planning an Energy-Efficient Landscape for Iowa: A Systems Approach | 1:45-2:45 p.m.
Any plan or vision for a sustainable future must take an integrated approach to energy use. Experts will paint a picture of an energy-efficient Iowa and alternatives to achieve it.
Panelists:
Fred Kirschenmann, Leopold Center Distinguished Fellow
Teresa Opheim, Practical Farmers of Iowa Executive Director, Ames
Duane Sand, policy consultant, Des Moines, Iowa
Representative, Iowa's new Office of Energy Independence [invited]

FOOD AND HEALTH
***7. Healthy People and Landscapes: Iowa's Future Food System | 10-11 a.m.
This session will provide both national and Iowa perspectives on the need to redesign our food system to address concerns about health, food security, farmer profitability, food safety and the environment.
Presenters:
Joan Dye Gussow, Professor Emeritus at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY; and author of This Organic Life;
Angie Tagtow, M.S., R.D., consultant

***8. Developing a Vibrant, Sustainable Regional Food System: The Case of Northeast Iowa | 12:30-1:30 p.m.
The W.K. Kellogg Foundation chose northeast Iowa for funding as part of its new Food and Fitness Initiative. Learn about innovative collaborations that already link community-based food systems with health, fitness and conservation. The Leopold Center's Regional Food Systems Working Group has partnered with this group over the last two years.
Panelists:
Lora Friest, Northeast Iowa RC&D, Decorah, Iowa
Ann Mansfield, R.N., M.S.N., Winneshiek Medical Center and Round Table Services for Luther College, Decorah, Iowa
Eric Nordschow, farmer and implement dealer, Decorah, Iowa

***9. Fish Bowl Discussion: A Walk Across the Food System | 1:45-2:45 p.m.
Discussants from all steps in the food chain will lead the audience on a journey across the food system using the fish bowl presentation format. They will describe the process of bringing a dairy product from the farm to ISU's Dining Service. Participants include owners of an Iowa dairy with on-farm processing, a food inspector, dietitian, food safety expert, dining service manager and residence hall student. The goal is to engage and challenge participants to use systems thinking to address problems to create a more transparent and participatory food system that will provide clear health benefits to consumers and economic benefits to rural communities.
Fish Bowl Participants:
Jill Burkhart, Picket Fence Creamery, Woodward, Iowa
Sue Stence, dairy farm and processing inspector, Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship
Doris Montgomery, dietitian, Iowa Department of Public Heath
Sam Beattie, Associate Professor, ISU Food Science and Human Nutrition
Erica Beirman, Manager, ISU Dining Services [invited]
Jenna Burkhart, ISU residence hall student, Woodward, Iowa

***10. Food Preparation Demonstration: Iowa Local Foods Show | 3:30-4:30 p.m.
Chefs from ISU and the University of Northern Iowa will prepare a new creation using a seasonal local food. Each chef will use the same tools and ingredients. Demonstration commentary will come from farmers who grew the local product, the chefs offering preparation tips, and a dietitian discussing how this food fits into a healthy diet.
Participants:
Facilitator and narrator: Rich Pirog, Initiative Leader, Leopold Center Marketing and Food Systems
Emily Krengel, Dietitian, Cass County Memorial Hospital

***11. Building Local Food Networks in Iowa: Progress and Potential | 12:30-1:30 p.m.
This session will trace the local food movement in Iowa from the early 1990s to the present and examine opportunities and challenges to meeting the increased demand for local food across a variety of market venues.
Panelists:
Neil Hamilton, Director, Drake Agricultural Law Center, Des Moines, Iowa
Susan Jutz, Grower, Local Harvest CSA and owner of ZJ Farm, Solon, Iowa
Kamyar Enshayan, Coordinator, UNI Local Food Project, Cedar Falls, Iowa

PEOPLE ON THE LAND
Aldo Leopold reminded us that people are not separate from the land, they are part of one community. This track features learning circles about four types of "capital" - ecological, human, social and economic - found in this one community.

***12. Maintaining the Land's Capacity for Self-Renewal | 10-11 a.m.
University of Northern Iowa biology professor Laura Jackson and ISU Extension wildlife specialist James Pease will explore what Aldo Leopold called the "health" of the land - its capacity for self-renewal.

***13. Opportunities for Beginning As Well As Begin-Again Farmers | 12:30-1:30 p.m.
Mike Duffy, ISU economist and director of the ISU Beginning Farmer Center, will discuss the challenges of entering agriculture for the first time. He will be joined by Robert Pridie of Akron and Steve Williams of Villisca, who have found different solutions to the same puzzle.

***14. Fish Bowl Discussion: Diversification on the Farm, in Rural Communities |12:30-1:30 p.m.
Discussants well-versed in soil quality, on-farm biodiversity, ecosystem management, agricultural economics, ecology and rural sociology will engage and challenge to create more diversity for the Iowa farmer and Iowa's rural communities. The fish bowl format will encourage lively interaction by all.
Fish Bowl Participants:
Heidi Asbjornsen, Associate Professor, ISU Natural Resource Ecology and Management
Doug Karlen, Scientist, National Soil Tilth Laboratory, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Ames
Matt Liebman, Professor, ISU Agronomy
Carol Williams, Research Associate, ISU Agronomy
Corry Bregendahl, Assistant Scientist, North Central Regional Center for Rural Development, Ames
Denise O'Brien, Executive Director, Women, Food and Agriculture Network; and Farmer, Atlantic, Iowa

***15. No Child Left Inside: Helping the Next Generation Discover a Sense of Place |1:45-2:45 p.m.
The emerging and spontaneous movement to reconnect children to the natural world cuts across the usual social, political and economic lines. Learn what's happening in Iowa to link children and nature, and see how to launch these activities in your school, neighborhood or community.
Presenters:
Gary Richards, Executive Director, Take a Kid Outdoors, Fayette, Iowa
Dick Jensen, Fayette farmer and founder, Take a Kid Outdoors, Fayette, Iowa [invited]

***16. Policies to Help Farmers Move toward Ecologically Sound, Profitable Farming | 3:30-4:30 p.m.
What public policies encourage or prevent growers from moving into more diversified and ecologically sound and economically profitable farming systems? What kind of reward system would appropriately compensate owner and users to care for the land with future generations in mind? Mike Duffy and Dave Swenson from the ISU Economics Department guide the discussion.

NATURAL RESOURCES
"The land ethic simply enlarges the boundaries of the community to include soils, waters, plants, and animals, or collectively: the land." -- Aldo Leopold.

Join us for a 3x3x3 - three panelists in three sessions with three minutes each to respond to a timely and provocative essay or opinion piece. Farmer respondents and the audience will join in the exchange and critique. People registered for this session are encouraged to preview each essay, posted on the conference web site by June 11. A summary of key points and background of Leopold-related work will be provided at each session. You can register for one or all of these 60-minute sessions.

***17. Rethinking Agriculture for Healthier Soil and Water | 10-11 a.m. | Limited to 30 people.
Panelists:
Doug Karlen, Scientist, National Soil Tilth Laboratory, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Ames
Dick Schultz, Professor, ISU Natural Resource Ecology and Management, and leader of the ISU Agroecology Research Team
Susan Heathcote, Water Program Director, Iowa Environmental Council, Des Moines
Francis Thicke, Organic Livestock Farmer and Owner, Radiance Dairy, Fairfield, Iowa

***18. Rethinking Agriculture for a Living Land z| 12:30-1:30 p.m. | Limited to 30 people.
Panelists:
Ed Woolsey, Energy and Environmental Consultant, Martinsdale, Iowa
Dave Swenson, Associate Scientist, ISU Economics
Dana Jackson, Associate Director, The Land Stewardship Project, White Bear Lake, Minnesota
Tom Frantzen,Organic Grain and Livestock Farmer, New Hampton, Iowa

***19. Rethinking Agriculture for Healthier Plants and Animals | 1:45-2:45 p.m. | Limited to 30 people.
Panelists:
Mark Honeyman, Coordinator, Iowa State Research Farms and Leader, ISU Hoop Group
Margaret Smith, Extension Program Specialist, ISU Value Added Agriculture Extension; and Farmer, Hampton
John Sandor, Professor, ISU Agronomy [invited]
Jody and Jim Kerns, Farmers, Trees, and Edgewood Meat Locker, Edgewood, Iowa

GENERAL TOPICS
***20. Twenty Years of Organic Agriculture: Sustainable Impacts | 10-11 a.m.
The Leopold Center's Long-Term Agro-ecological Research at the Neely-Kinyon Farm is believed to be the largest randomized, replicated comparison of organic and conventional crops in the nation. This session will offer an overview of some of the important learning that has taken place.
Presenters:
Kathleen Delate, Associate Professor, ISU Agronomy and Horticulture; and lead organic researcher
Cynthia Cambardella, Associate Professor, National Soil Tilth Laboratory, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Ames
Ron and Maria Rosmann, Organic Farmers, Harlan, Iowa

***21. Learning from the Legacy of Aldo Leopold | 1:45-2:45 p.m.
What would Aldo Leopold tell us today? Buddy Huffaker from the Aldo Leopold Foundation will share his thoughts as well as report on activities underway at Leopold's Shack in Wisconsin. This session also will offer a look at Leopold's Iowa ties.
Presenters:
Wellington "Buddy" Huffaker, Executive Director, Aldo Leopold Foundation, Baraboo, Wisconsin
Jack Payne, ISU Vice President for Extension and Leopold Center Advisory Board member
Jerry Rigdon, Leopold Heritage Group, Burlington, Iowa

***22. America's Lost Landscape, the Tallgrass Prairie | 10-11 a.m. and 1:45-2:45 p.m.
View this nationally televised documentary about one of human history's most astonishing whole-scale alterations of nature. Awarded numerous honors, the 60-minute documentary was produced by David O'Shields and Daryl Smith, UNI biology professor and director of the UNI Tallgrass Prairie Center. Introducing the documentary will be Cedar Falls farmer John Miller, who was interviewed for the documentary and is a former member of the Leopold Center Advisory Board.

***23. Telling the Sustainable Agriculture Story | 12:30-1:30 p.m. and 3:30-4:30 p.m.
This session features a sampling of the new media that other groups use to tell their story. New media include video clips, animated shorts and documentary films.

Source [http://www.ucs.iastate.edu/mnet/leopold/level1.html]
Source PDF [http://www.ucs.iastate.edu/mnet/_repository/2007/leopold/pdf/breakout.pdf]

Registration
[https://www.ucs.iastate.edu/mnet/leopold/quickregister.html]

Lodging
[http://www.ucs.iastate.edu/mnet/leopold/lodging.html]

Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture Website

[http://www.leopold.iastate.edu/]

ISU Institute of Science and Society: Expanded Focus

Bioeconomy Expansion: Environmental, Economic, Social, and Policy Implications for Iowa and the Nation

[The mission of] The Institute of Science and Society [at Iowa State University] is to highlight the role of the social sciences in research and education in the college and university, raise the visibility of interdisciplinary research and education involving the social sciences, grow interdisciplinary and policy research with the natural and engineering sciences as well as the humanities, and highlight policy issues of critical importance to Iowa and the nation. To achieve this mission, we will sponsor the following program of activities:

***Workshops/seminars highlighting interdisciplinary research involving the social sciences in the college and university as well as at other institutions
***Jointly sponsor forums on implications of bioeconomy expansion
***Collaborate and cooperate with other institutes and centers in sciences, engineering, agriculture, and humanities at Iowa State University
***Seed grants for developing interdisciplinary seminars and research proposals, and
***Efforts to better position faculty for external funding

... [T]he current focus of the Institute of Science and Society [has changed]to "Bioeconomy Expansion: Environmental, Economic, Social, and Policy Implications for Iowa and the Nation." ... [T]his expanded focus will facilitate the integration of social sciences research and education into what is happening in other Liberal Arts and Sciences' departments, centers and colleges, and the university's mission.

[It is] ... anticipate[d] [that the Institute will be] ... involved with a range of activities and projects addressing the growing bioeconomy from how do markets and policies drive the expansion to what are the water quality and quantity, climate change, risk and science policy, and social and community implications.

Source [http://www.las.iastate.edu/iss/letter.shtml]

Sunday, May 27, 2007

Biobased Industry Outlook Conference(s)

Biobased Industry Outlook Conference(s)

The annual Biobased Industry Outlook Conference has established a reputation for being "the" Midwestern event where industry and community leaders, academicians, and government agents gather to learn and share information about manufacturing, distributing, and marketing biobased products.

2007
Growing the Bioeconomy: Science and Policy for Next Generation Biorefining
November 5-6, 2007 | Iowa State University | Ames IA
[http://www.bioeconomyconference.org/]

Keynote Speakers
***Craig Venter, Synthetic Genomics, Inc.
***Ryan Lance, VP, Biofuels, ConocoPhillips
***Suzanne Hunt, Bioenergy Project Manager, Worldwatch Institute
***Vinod Khosla, Founder, Khosla Ventures
***Jeff Broin, CEO POET, formerly known as Broin Companies
***Jeremy Tomkinson, Executive Director, NNFCC, UK (invited)
***United States Senator Tom Harkin, D–Iowa (tentative confirmation)
***United States Senator Chuck Grassley, R–Iowa (tentative confirmation)
[http://www.bioeconomyconference.org/07speakers.htm]

The 2007 Biobased Industry Outlook will coincide with the national presidential candidates' debates being hosted at Iowa State on the evenings of November 5-6. Conference participants will be able to attend the debates, which will probably be nationally televised. The Republican debates will be held on one night and the Democratic debates will be held on the other.

2006
Growing the Bioeconomy: Science and Policy for Next Generation Biorefining
August 28-29,2006 | Iowa State University | Ames IA
[http://www.bioeconomyconference.org/agenda.html]

Keynote Speakers
***Jim Breson, EBI General Project Manager, British Petroleum
***Jason Grumet, Executive Director, National Commission on Energy Policy
***Lee Lynd, professor of engineering, Dartmouth College
***Vinod Khosla, founding CEO, Sun Microsystems

Breson discussed the role that oil companies can play in significantly increasing the production and use of biofuels in the U.S.

Lynd described several potential models for integrated biorefineries,
different types of crops that can provide the raw materials needed
for large scale bioenergy production, and ways to integrate the
production of food, feed, fiber, and energy.

Grumet discussed the Commission on Energy Policy's strategic vision for policy development and advocacy.

Khosla, a venture capitalist, described his vision for supporting the continued growth of the bioeconomy.
[http://www.bioeconomyconference.org/speakers.html]

Speaker Presentations
NOTE: Select presentations have not been made available at the request of the speaker(s).
***Anex, Robert | Feedstocks/Nutrient Recycling/Soil/ Water
***Birrell, Stuart | Biomass/Feedstock/Harvest/Storage Systems
***Boulard, David | Thermochemical Technologies
***Bozell, Joe | Technical Overview of Biorefineries
***Clause, Reg | Biobased Business Development
***Cruse, Richard | Feedstocks/Nutrient Recycling/Soil/Water
***Duncan, Marv | Federal Biobased Products Preferred Procurement
***Egerton, Robert | Capitalization Strategies
***English, Burton | Feedstock Supply
***Erickson, Jon | Thermochemical Technologies
***Euken, Jill | Economic Interactions: Biofuels/Agricultural Markets
***Fuhrman, Ron | Business Solutions for Small "Bio" Companies
***Glassner, David | Advanced Technology Commercialization
***Grumet, Jason | Keynote Address
***Haney, Dave | Transportation Needs for the Bioeconomy
***Hanna, Milford | New Directions in Oleochemicals
***Hart, Chad | Ethanol and Livestock
***Hartzler, Chad | Producing Biodiesel: The Renewable Energy Group
***Heaton, Emily | Feedstocks/Nutrient Recycling/Soil/ Water
***Heine, Bruce | Transportation Needs for the Bioeconomy
***Horner, Bill | Commercializing Biobased Products
***Jenkins, Bryan | Technical Overview of Biorefineries
***Johnson, Delayne | Commercializing Biobased Products
***Jolly, Robert | Economic Interactions: Biofuels/Agricultural Markets
***Keck, Pam Human | Resources Issues and the Bioeconomy
***Keller, Suzanne | Human Resources Issues and the Bioeconomy
***Khosla, Vinod | Keynote Address
***Larock, Richard | New Directions in Oleochemicals
***Lindquist, Mark | Advanced Technology Commercialization
***Lovass, Deron | Advanced Technology Commercialization
***Lynd, Lee | Keynote Address
***Lynd, Lee | New Directions in Carbohydrates
***Miranowski, John | Economic Interactions: Biofuels/Agricultural Markets
***Novak, Carey | Biobased Business Development
***Novak, Carey | Commercializing Biobased Products
***Ott, Mike | Business Solutions for Small "Bio" Companies
***Pollack, Jim | Commercializing Biobased Products
***Raman, Raj | Human Resources Issues and the Bioeconomy
***Reardon, | John Thermochemical Technologies
***Sellers, John | Feedstock Supply
***Sheehan, John | Technical Overview of Biorefineries
***Shore, Craig | Commercializing Biobased Products
***Siembieda, Steve | Biobased Business Development
***Stern, Michael | Ethanol and Livestock
***Trenkle, Allen | Ethanol and Livestock
***Wisner, Robert | Economic Interactions: : Biofuels/Agricultural Markets
***Wong, Jetta | Advanced Technology Commercialization
[http://www.bioeconomyconference.org/registration.html]

Webcasts
Keynote Addresses:
***Lee Lynd
***Vinod Khosla
Breakout Sessions:
***Ethanol and Livestock: Synergies or Competition (Chad Hart, Mike Stern, Allen Trenkle)
***Technical Overview of Biorefineries (Joe Bozell, Bryan Jenkins, John Sheehan)
***Innovations in Carbohydrate Production and Processing (Lee Lynd)
***Economic Interactions of Biofuels and Agricultural Markets (Jill Euken, Robert Jolly, John Miranowski, Robert Wisner)
[http://www.bioeconomyconference.org/webcasts.html]

2005
Growing the Bioeconomy: Planting Ideas * Cultivating Partnerships * Harvesting Progress
August 29-30, 2005 | Iowa State University | Ames IA
[http://www.bioeconomyconference.org/Conf2005/schedule.html]
Presentations
By Speaker Last Name
***Andreja Bakac, Adjunct Professor, Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University
Bio | Presentation
Session: Iowa State University Center for Catalysis Research Presentations

***Paul Bloom, Manger, New Industrial Chemicals, ADM
Bio | Presentation
Session: Bioproducts from Crop Oils

***Roger Conway, Director, Office of Energy Policy and New Uses, USDA
Bio
Session: Developing Market Pull for Biobased Products

***Charles Cox, Asst. Professor, Microbiology, University of Iowa
Bio | Presentation
Session: Iowa Biotechnology Byproducts Consortium Research Presentations

***Randy Dipner, Consultant, PBC, Inc.
Bio
Session: SBIR as a Funding Source for Commercializing New Bioproduction Technologies

***Mark Downing, Research Scientist, U.S. Department of Energy
Bio | Presentation
Session: Residues and Dedicated Energy Crops

***Mike Duffy, Economist, Iowa State University Department of Agriculture Economics
Bio | Presentation
Session: Conservation and the Bioeconomy

***Marvin Duncan, Senior Agricultural Economist in the Office of Energy Policy and New Uses, USDA
Bio | Presentation
Session: Developing Market Pull for Biobased Products

***Sevim Erhan, Research Leader, Food and Industrial Oil Research, NCAUR
Bio | Presentation
Session: Bioproducts from Crop Oils

***Doug Faulkner, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
Bio | Session: U.S. Department of Energy Priorities

***William Gong, Research Associate, Topic Leader in PTA R&T, BP America
Bio
Session: Biorefineries: Opportunities for Business and Research Partnerships

***Philip Goodrich, Associate Professor, Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, University of Minnesota
Bio | Presentation
Session: Manure as a Feedstock for Biobased Products

***Daryl Haack, Chairman, National Corn Growers Association Ethanol Committee
Bio | Presentation
Session: Biorefineries: Opportunities for Business and Research Partnerships

***Stephen Halsey, Managing Supervisor, Gibbs & Soel
Bio | Presentation
Session: Developing Market Pull for Biobased Products

***James Hettenhaus, Co-founder, cea, Inc.
Bio | Presentation
Session: Residues and Dedicated Energy Crops

***Matt Janes, Vice President of Technology, VeraSun Energy Corporation
Bio
Session: Ethanol Efficiencies and DDGs

***Stanley R. Johnson, Vice Provost for University Extension at Iowa State University
Bio
Session: Opening Remarks - August 30

***Samir K. Khanal, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Iowa State University
Bio | Presentation
Session: Iowa Biotechnology Byproducts Consortium Research Presentations

***John Laflen, Adjunct Professor of Agricultural Engineering at Iowa State University
Bio | Presentation
Session: Conservation and the Bioeconomy

***David Laird, Soil Scientist, National Soil Tilth Lab
Bio | Presentation
Session: Conservation and the Bioeconomy

***Greg Langmo, Development Consultant, FibroMinn
Bio | Presentation - Send email to request presentation
Session: Manure as a Feedstock for Biobased Products

***Tom Latham, Iowa Congressman
Bio
Session: Luncheon Speaker - August 29

***Rich Leopold, Executive Director, Iowa Environmental Council
Bio
Session: Conservation and the Bioeconomy

***Victor Lin, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University
Bio
Session: Iowa State University Center for Catalysis Research Presentations

***Lee Lynd, Professor of Engineering, Dartmouth College
Bio | Presentation
Session: The Role of Biomass in Meeting U.S. Energy Needs

***James McLaren, President, StrathKirn, Inc.
Bio | Presentation
Session: Residues and Dedicated Energy Crops

***Karen Merrick, Biosciences Coordinator, Iowa Department of Economic Development
Bio
Session: SBIR as a Funding Source for Commercializing New Bioproduction Technologies - Q&A Session

***Sally Metz, Technical Lead for Corn Ethanol, Monsanto
Bio
Session: Biorefineries: Opportunities for Business and Research Partnerships

***Carl Muska, Safety, Health and the Environment Manager, DuPont
Bio | Presentation
Session: Biorefineries: Opportunities for Business and Research Partnerships

***Shri Ramaswamy, Professor and Department Head, University of Minnesota
Bio | Presentation
Session: Natural Fibers and Composites

***Tom Robb, Coproducts Manager, Abengoa
Bio | Presentation
Session: Ethanol Efficiencies and DDGs

***Paul Roberts, Author of The End of Oil: On the Edge of a Perilous New World
Bio
Session: The End of Oil - Keynote Address

***John (Jack) Rosazza, Director of Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing, University of Iowa
Bio
Session: Iowa Biotechnology Byproducts Consortium Research Presentations

***Stephen Shaler, Professor of Wood Science and Technology, University of Maine-Orono
Bio | Presentation
Session: Natural Fibers and Composites

***Brent Shanks, Associate Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, Iowa State University
Bio | Presentation
Session: Iowa Biotechnology Byproducts Consortium Research Presentations

***Craig Shore, President, Creative Composites
Bio | Presentation
Session: Natural Fibers and Composites

***Jeff Stroburg, CEO, West Central Cooperative
Bio | Presentation 1
Session: Biorefineries: Opportunities for Business and Research Partnerships
Presentation 2
Session: Bioproducts from Crop Oils

***Tim Swanson, Director of Research and Development, ICM
Bio
Session: Ethanol Efficiencies and DDGs

***John M. Sweeten, Resident Director, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station
Bio | Presentation
Session: Manure as a Feedstock for Biobased Products

***John Verkade, Professor, Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University
Bio | Presentation
Session: Iowa State University Center for Catalysis Research Presentations

***Thomas Vilsack, Governor of Iowa
Bio
Session: Opening Remarks - August 29

Posters
A special poster session was held in conjunction with the evening reception on August 29, 2005. Investigators affiliated [with the] Iowa Biotechnology Byproducts Consortium (BBC), Iowa State University's Center for Catalysis (CCAT), the Center for Crops Utilization Research (CCUR) at Iowa State, and the Office of Biorenewables Programs (OBP) at Iowa State presented posters that describe new and on-going research projects.
[http://www.bioeconomyconference.org/Conf2005/ResearchPosters.pdf]

2004
BIOconference 2004: Biobased Industry Outlook
March 7-8, 2004 | Iowa State University | Ames IA
[http://www.bioeconomyconference.org/Conf2004/BIOschedule.html]

Speakers
Dr. Stanley Johnson, Vice Provost for ISU Extension
Merlin Bartz | USDA (invited)
James Fischer | DOE (invited)
Georg Anderl | BIOWA
Floyd Barwig |Director, Iowa Energy Center
Kevin Kephart |Syngas fermentation
Jeff Stroburg | West Central Cooperative
Blake Hollis | UNI-ABIL
Lou Honary | UNI-ABIL
Diane Neuzil |UNI-ABIL
Mike Blouin |Director, IA Dept. of Economic Dev.
Steve Howell | ISU
Ken Moore | ISU
Robert Brown | ISU
Doug Stokke | ISU
Rob Anex | ISU
Marvin Duncan | USDA
Steve Devlin | CIRAS - ISU Extension
Bruce Coney |Central Iowa Procurement Center
Ramani Narayan |ASTM
[http://www.bioeconomyconference.org/Conf2004/BIOspeakers.html]

Presentations [NOT AVAILABLE]
[http://www.bioeconomyconference.org/Conf2004/BIOPresentations.html]

Posters
[http://www.bioeconomyconference.org/Conf2004/BIOposters.html]

Saturday, May 26, 2007

Staying Home: How Ethanol Will Change U.S. Corn Exports

Staying Home: How Ethanol Will Change U.S. Corn Exports

Written by Heather Schoonover, Program Associate, and
Mark Muller, Director, Environment and Agriculture Program
Minneaspolis: The Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy
Published December 2006

Executive Summary
U.S. ethanol production is expanding at a phenomenal pace, doubling between 2001 and 2005 and likely to double again in the next few years. While some corn needed to meet higher ethanol demand could come from increased production, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) states that much of the additional corn needed for ethanol production will be diverted from exports. Despite this fact, there has been little focus on or discussion of the impact of corn-based ethanol on U.S. corn exports. But these impacts could be significant, and ethanol’s potential impact on corn exports should cause policymakers to reconsider their long-standing focus on exports.

The U.S. already has over 100 active ethanol plants capable of producing more than five billion gallons of ethanol per year. An additional 58 plants currently under construction or expansion will add nearly four billion more gallons of capacity, bringing total capacity to nearly nine billion gallons—and surpassing the Renewable Fuels Standard requirement of 7.5 billion gallons by 2012, far ahead of schedule. In addition, if all 150 currently proposed ethanol plants were to be built, U.S. ethanol capacity would surpass 19 billion gallons per year.

While ethanol from cellulosic sources looks promising, corn will continue to be the primary source of ethanol in the near future. Given the continued enormous expansion of ethanol capacity, this will result in significant shifts in the corn market.

In a break from past projections, many of the major agricultural organizations are now projecting flat corn export levels or even a decline in corn exports, citing ethanol as a key to this change. But even these new projections are likely to underestimate the impact of ethanol on exports, because they do not take into consideration the many ethanol plants currently on the drawing board.

Factoring in the impact of proposed ethanol plants yields some stunning results. For example, if only a quarter of the plants currently proposed in the Midwest do come on line, and if the corn needed to supply these plants and the plants currently under construction were to be diverted from exports, Midwest corn exports could be cut in half. This shift would impact some states more than others. For example, Nebraska could see negative corn exports (meaning corn needed for ethanol plants would exceed corn for exports) if only a fraction of its proposed plants come online.

The growing demand for corn from the ethanol industry will result in several shifts in the Midwest agricultural economy. First, higher prices will likely induce more farmers to grow corn. Second, the livestock industry may reduce its Midwest corn demand, either by using alternative feed sources or raising less Midwest livestock. Yet even with these shifts, it appears very likely that ethanol will reduce the availability of corn for export.

The shift of agricultural land into energy production and bio-based products is not likely to reverse course anytime in the near future. Whatever the crop—be it corn or switchgrass—domestic markets are likely to provide more opportunities to farmers than the export of agricultural commodities. Our agricultural, transportation and trade policies also need to shift to address this new reality and truly invest in the future of U.S. agriculture.

Full Text Available
[http://www.agobservatory.org/library.cfm?refid=96658]

Wednesday, May 23, 2007

Impact of High Crop Prices on Environmental Quality

Impact of High Crop Prices on Environmental Quality: A Case of Iowa and the Conservation Reserve Program
Silvia Secchi, Bruce A. Babcock
May 2007 [07-WP 447]

Growing demand for corn due to the expansion of ethanol has increased concerns that environmentally sensitive lands retired from agricultural production into the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) will be cropped again. Iowa produces more ethanol than any other state in the United States, and it also produces the most corn. Thus, an examination of the impacts of higher crop prices on CRP land in Iowa can give insight into what we might expect nationally in the years ahead if crop prices remain high. We construct CRP land supply curves for various corn prices and then estimate the environmental impacts of cropping CRP land through the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model. EPIC provides edge-of-field estimates of soil erosion, nutrient loss, and carbon sequestration. We find that incremental impacts increase dramatically as higher corn prices bring into production more and more environmentally fragile land. Maintaining current levels of environmental quality will require substantially higher spending levels. Even allowing for the cost savings that would accrue as CRP land leaves the program, a change in targeting strategies will likely be required to ensure that the most sensitive land does not leave the program.

Full Text Available
[http://www.card.iastate.edu/publications/DBS/PDFFiles/07wp447.pdf]
Source [http://www.card.iastate.edu/publications/synopsis.aspx?id=1046]

Saturday, May 19, 2007

Water Use by Ethanol Plants: Potential Challenges

Water Use by Ethanol Plants: Potential Challenges

Written by Dennis Keeney, Ph.D., Senior Fellow and Mark Muller, Director, Environment and Agriculture Program. Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, October 2006.

Ethanol production using corn grain has exploded in the Upper Midwest. This new demand for corn, and the new opportunities for value-added processing and cattle production in rural communities, has created the best economic development opportunity in the Corn Belt states in a generation or more. Ethanol demand has increased rapidly recently because of favorable economics of ethanol vs. gasoline, and the need for a performance enhancer to replace MTBE (methyl tertiary-butyl ether)in gasoline. Ethanol’s growth has been so dramatic that there are now concerns about the amount of corn available to meet various demands, including food, animal feed and export.

Overall, with increased research and investment in the industry and the potential for energy-efficient cellulosic material to displace corn as the primary feedstock, the environmental footprint of ethanol is expected to markedly diminish. However, one of the most important emerging concerns is the consumptive use of water. Consumptive use of water is broadly defined as any use of water that reduces the supply from which it is withdrawn or diverted.

As would be expected, most ethanol plants are being sited in the Corn Belt. Many of these regions are also experiencing significant water supply concerns, particularly in the western portion of the region. Minimal data is available on groundwater depletion, and the scope of future water availability is not clear. It will be to the benefit of the ethanol industry, and rural development initiatives in general, to get more clarity on the relationship between ethanol production, water consumption, and impacts on water supplies. Otherwise, shortage of water could be the Achilles heel of corn-based and perhaps cellulose-based ethanol

[http://www.agobservatory.org/library.cfm?refid=89449]

Thursday, May 17, 2007

Water and Bioeconomy: 2007 Iowa Water Conference

Water and Bioeconomy: 2007 Iowa Water Conference
Scheman Building, Iowa State Center, Ames IA | March 6, 2007 |

The emerging bioenergy industry in Iowa will impact local and regional water resources. Significant changes in agricultural systems, management practices, and water demands to satisfy the growing bioenergy industry have the potential to both positively and negatively affect surface and ground water. The purpose of this conference is to address the question:

How will the biofuel industry affect sustainability of Iowa's water resources, and how will water resources affect the sustainability of the biofuel industry?
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Conference objectives
Clarify the relationship between the bioenergy industry, and water quality and quantity.
Identify what additional information is needed about these relationships.
Suggest means to address these needs.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Iowa Water Center will summarize input gathered from the conference working groups and develop recommendations that address water resource opportunities and challenges related to the growing biofuel industry. The recommendations will be provided to industry leaders, researchers and other key stakeholders.

Source [http://www.aep.iastate.edu/water/homepage.html]

Proceedings


20 years of the Iowa Groundwater Protection Act
Jerry DeWitt, director, Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture
[http://www.aep.iastate.edu/water/2007/dewitt.html]

Direction of the biofuel industry in Iowa
Greg Krissek, Iowa Renewable Fuel Association
[http://www.aep.iastate.edu/water/2007/krissek.html]

A new agriculture
Jill Euken, Industrial specialist-biobased products, Iowa State University Extension
[http://www.aep.iastate.edu/water/2007/euken.html]

Economic drivers of change
Bruce Babcock, director, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development, Iowa State University
[http://www.aep.iastate.edu/water/2007/babcock.html]

Riding the bioeconomy wave: Smooth sailing or rough water for the environment and public health?
Gene Parkin, director, Center for Health Effects of Groundwater Contamination, University of Iowa
[http://www.aep.iastate.edu/water/2007/parkin.html]

Water quantity implications of biofuel production
Bob Libra, Iowa Department of Natural Resources
[http://www.aep.iastate.edu/water/2007/libra.html]

Compounded influences: Opportunities for water resources
Rick Cruse, director, Iowa Water Center, Iowa State University
[http://www.aep.iastate.edu/water/2007/cruse.html]

The summarization and final report from the four working groups is still in progress.

Source [http://www.aep.iastate.edu/water/2007/homepage.html]

Adoption Subsidies and Environmental Impacts of Alternative Energy Crops

Adoption Subsidies and Environmental Impacts of Alternative Energy Crops

Bruce A. Babcock, Philip W. Gassman, Manoj Jha, and Catherine L. Kling
Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD), Iowa State University, Ames IA (Briefing Paper 07-BP 50)March 2007

Executive Summary
We provide estimates of the costs associated with inducing substantial conversion of land from production of traditional crops to switchgrass. Higher traditional crop prices due to increased demand for corn from the ethanol industry has increased the relative advantage that row crops have over switchgrass. Results indicate that farmers will convert to switchgrass production only with significant conversion subsidies. To examine potential environmental consequences of conversion, we investigate three stylized landscape usage scenarios, one with an entire conversion of a watershed to switchgrass production, a second with the entire watershed planted to continuous corn under a 50% removal rate of the biomass, and a third scenario that places switchgrass on the most erodible land in the watershed and places continuous corn on the least erodible. For each of these illustrative scenarios, the watershed-scale Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) hydrological model (Arnold et al., 1998; Arnold and Forher, 2005) is used to evaluate the effect of these landscape uses on sediment and nutrient loadings in the Maquoketa Watershed in eastern Iowa.

Bruce Babcock is a professor of economics and director of the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD). Philip Gassman and Manoj Jha are assistant scientists at CARD. Catherine Kling is a professor of economics and head of the Resource and Environmental Policy Division at CARD.

This paper was prepared for presentation at “Alternative Crops and Alternative Policies for Bioenergy,” an Iowa State University Extension program provided through Web cast to Extension offices.

This paper is available online on the CARD Web site: www.card.iastate.edu. Permission is granted to excerpt or quote this information with appropriate attribution to the authors.

Source
[http://www.card.iastate.edu/publications/DBS/PDFFiles/07bp50.pdf]

Sunday, May 13, 2007

Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

M. Wang, C. Saricks, and D. Santini

Center for Transportation Research, Energy Systems Division,
Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439

ANL/ESD-38
January 1999

Table of Contents

Notation..... v
Acknowledgments ..... vi
Summary ...... 1
1 Introduction ..... 7
2 Approach ..... 9
3 Key Assumptions ..... 11
3.1 Corn Farming ...... 11
3.2 Potential Land Use Changes Caused by Corn Ethanol Production ..... 11
3.3 Corn-Based Ethanol Production ..... 13
3.4 Biomass Farming and Transportation ...... 15
3.5 Production of Ethanol from Biomass ...... 15
3.6 Ethanol Vehicle Fuel Economy..... 17
4 Results ...... 18
5 References ...... 29

Figures
1 Corn/Biomass-to-Ethanol and Petroleum-to-Gasoline Fuel Cycle ..... 10
2 Net Energy Balance per Gallon of Ethanol ..... 19
3 Fuel-Cycle Petroleum Use of Gasoline and Ethanol Blends by Stage ..... 21
4 Fuel-Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Gasoline and Ethanol Blends by Stage ..... 22
5 Fuel-Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Gasoline and Ethanol Blends by Gas ..... 23
6 Fuel-Cycle Fossil Energy Use of Gasoline and Ethanol Blends by Stage ..... 24

Tables
1 Co-Product Yields in Ethanol Plants ..... 14
2 Co-Product Displacement Ratios ..... 14
3 Energy and Chemical Use for Biomass Farming and Transportation ..... 15
4 Feedstock Requirements, Energy Use, and Electricity Generation
Credits in Cellulosic Ethanol Plants ...... 16
5 Parametric Assumptions for Current Case, Near-Future Case, and Future Case ...... 18
6 Reductions in per-Vehicle-Mile GHG Emissions and Energy Use
by Ethanol Blends ..... 25
7 Sensitivity Analysis: Reductions in per-Vehicle-Mile GHG Emissions and
Energy Use by Ethanol Blends ..... 26
8 Reductions in GHG Emissions and Energy Use per Gallon of Ethanol
in Ethanol Blends ..... 27
9 Sensitivity Analysis: Reductions in GHG Emissions and Energy Use
per Gallon of Ethanol in Ethanol Blends ...... 28

Work sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Technology Utilization, Office of Transportation Technologies

Source
[http://www.ethanol-gec.org/information/briefing/10.pdf]

Agriculture-Based Renewable Energy Production

Agriculture-Based Renewable Energy Production

Randy Schnepf
Specialist in Agricultural Policy Resources, Science, and Industry Division, Congressional Research Service

RL32712
Updated March 7 2007

Summary
Since the late 1970s, U.S. policy makers at both the federal and state levels have enacted a variety of incentives, regulations, and programs to encourage the production and use of agriculture-based renewable energy. Motivations cited for these legislative initiatives include energy security concerns, reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, and raising domestic demand for U.S.-produced farm products. Agricultural households and rural communities have responded to these government incentives and have expanded their production of renewable energy, primarily in the form of biofuels and wind power, every year since 1996.

The production of ethanol (the primary biofuel produced by the agricultural sector) has risen from about 175 million gallons in 1980 to nearly 4.9 billion gallons per year in 2006. The U.S. ethanol production capacity has also been expanding rapidly, particularly since mid-2006, with important implications for the food and fuel sectors. Current ethanol production capacity is 5.6 billion gallons per year (February 28, 2007), with another 6.2 billion gallons of capacity under construction and potentially online by late 2008.

Biodiesel production is at a much smaller level, but has also shown growth rising from 0.5 million gallons in 1999 to an estimated 200 million gallons in 2006.

Wind energy systems production capacity has also grown rapidly, rising from 1,706 megawatts in 1997 to an estimated 11,603 megawatts by December 31, 2006.

Despite this rapid growth, agriculture- and ruralbased energy production accounted for only about 0.7% of total U.S. energy consumption in 2006.

Key points that emerge from this report are:

*substantial federal and state programs and incentives have facilitated development of agriculture’s renewable energy production capacity;

*rising fossil fuel prices improve renewable energy’s market competitiveness, whereas higher costs for feedstock and plant operating fuel (e.g., natural gas) dampen profitability;

*technological improvements for biofuel production (e.g., cellulosic conversion) enhance its economic competitiveness with fossil fuels;

*farm-based energy production is unlikely to substantially reduce the nation’s dependence on petroleum imports unless there is a significant decline in energy consumption; and

*ethanol-driven higher corn prices have raised concerns from corn users over rising food and feed costs, as well as the potential for increased soil erosion and chemical usage from substantially expanded corn production.

This report provides background information on farm-based energy production and how this fits into the national energy-use picture. It briefly reviews the primary agriculture-based renewable energy types and issues of concern associated with their production, particularly their economic and energy efficiencies and long-run supply.

Finally, this report examines the major legislation related to farm-based energy production and use. This report will be updated as events warrant.

Contents
Introduction . . . . . 1
Agriculture’s Share of Energy Production . . . . . 3
Agriculture-Based Biofuels . . . . . 5
Ethanol . . . . . . 5
Ethanol Pricing Issues . . . . . 7
Corn-Based Ethanol . . . . . . 9
Ethanol from Cellulosic Biomass Crops . . . . . 19
Methane from an Anaerobic Digester . . . . . 24
Biodiesel . . . . . 26
Wind Energy Systems . . . . . 32
Public Laws That Support Agriculture-Based Energy Production and Use . . . . . 40
Tariff on Imported Ethanol . . . . . 40
Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA; P.L. 101-549) . . . . . 40
Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT; P.L. 102-486) . . . . . 40
Biomass Research and Development Act of 2000 (Biomass Act; Title III, P.L.
106-224) . . . . . 41
Energy Provisions in the 2002 Farm Bill (P.L. 107-171) . . . . . 42
The Healthy Forest Restoration Act of 2003 (P.L. 108-148) . . . . . 45
The American Jobs Creation Act of 2004 (P.L. 108-357) . . . . . 45
Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT; P.L. 109-58) . . . . . 46
Tax Relief and Health Care Act of 2006 (P.L. 109-432) . . . . . 49
Agriculture-Related Energy Bills in 110th Congress . . . . 49
State Laws and Programs . . . . . 49
Administration Proposals . . . . . 50
State of the Union (SOU) 2006 . . . . . 50
State of the Union (SOU) 2007 . . . . . 50
USDA’s New Farm Bill Proposal (January 2007) . . . . . 51
For More Information . . . . . 51
Renewable Energy . . . . 51
Biofuels . . . . . 51
Wind Energy Systems . . . . . 54

List of Figures
Figure 1. U.S. Motor Vehicle Fuel Use, 2006 . . . . . 6
Figure 2. Ethanol versus Gasoline Prices, 1991-2006 . . . . . 8
Figure 3. U.S. Ethanol Production: Actual & Projected, versus the
Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) . . . . . 9
Figure 4. Corn versus Ethanol Prices, 1991-2006 . . . . . 12
Figure 5. U.S. Biodiesel Production, 1998-2006 . . . . . 27
Figure 6. Soybean Oil vs. Diesel Fuel Price, 1994-2006 . . . . . 29
Figure 7. U.S. Installed Wind Energy Capacity, 1981-2007P . . . . . 33
Figure 8. Natural Gas Price, Wholesale, 1994-2006 . . . . . 36
Figure 9. U.S. Areas with Highest Wind Potential . . . . . 39

List of Tables
Table 1. U.S. Energy Production and Consumption, 2006 . . . . . 3
Table 2. Energy and Price Comparisons for Alternate Fuels,
September-October 2006 . . . . . . 4
Table 3. Ethanol Production Capacity by State, February 25, 2007 . . . . . 7
Table 4. Ethanol Dry Mill Cost of Production Estimates, 2002 . . . . . . 11
Table 5. U.S. Diesel Fuel Use, 2005 . . . . . 28
Table 6. U.S. Potential Biodiesel Feedstock, 2005-2006 . . . . . 31
Table 7. Installed Wind Energy Capacity by State, Ranked by Capacity
as of December 31, 2006 . . . . . 34

Source [http://www.nationalaglawcenter.org/assets/crs/RL32712.pdf]

Sustainable Bioenergy: A Framework for Decision Makers

Sustainable Bioenergy: A Framework for Decision Makers
Matss Karlsson, Chair, UN-Energy, April 2007

Modern bioenergy could help to meet the needs of 1.6 billion people who lacked access to electricity and 2.4 billion people who relied on the use of traditional biomass, Alexander Muller, Assistant Director-General for the Sustainable Development Department of the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), told correspondents at a Headquarters press conference today. Presenting the latest report of UN-Energy, entitled Sustainable energy: A framework for decision-makers, he added that, while bioenergy presented great opportunity, especially for the world’s rural poor, a political framework was needed to ensure that they benefited from bioenergy.
[snip]
Biofuels, stated Mr. Muller, accounted for the fastest-growing market for agricultural products around the world and was a billion-dollar business. Increasing oil prices in recent years had had devastating effects on many poor countries, some of which spent six times as much on fuel as they did on health. In that regard, the modern form of bioenergy could create great opportunity. The report provided a framework for the worldwide use of bioenergy, not only for developed and industrialized countries in mitigating the effects of climate change, but also for the poorest countries to gain access to modern forms of electricity.
[snip]
The origin of the report was the realization that UN-Energy could contribute to the international discussion on the topic, Gustavo Best, UN-Energy’s Vice-Chairman, said. Describing the report’s format, he said the document provided a framework for discussing -- at the same time -- nine key sustainability issues facing bioenergy development including the implications for food security, health and gender, trade, foreign exchange balances and energy security and climate change. Unless new policies were enacted to steer bioenergy use, the environmental and social damages could in some cases outweigh the benefits.
[snip]
Any bioenergy strategy must ensure that poor people did not end up paying for the fact that the industrialized world needed more bioenergy, Mr. Muller said.

Source [http://www.un.org/News/briefings/docs/2007/070508_Energy.doc.htm]

Full Text Available
[http://esa.un.org/un-energy/pdf/susdev.Biofuels.FAO.pdf]

UN Radio Segment Available
[http://radio.un.org/story.asp?NewsID=6903]

Thursday, May 10, 2007

ISU Town Hall Meeting on Biorenewable Resources

Iowa State University President Gregory L. Geoffroy addresses attendees at a campus-wide Town Hall Meeting on Biorenewable Resources held October 23 2006 at the university. The presentation provides background information on bionewables and the expertise of Iowa State University and current future opportunities for the university.

Includes a Question and Answer session with Geoffroy, ISU faculty experts, and attendees.

Final Report and Recommendations (December 12 2006)
[http://www.iastate.edu/~biorenew/06/summit/report.doc]

Video of the Town Hall Meeting on Biorenewable Resources is available in the following formats:

Breeze video
http://breeze.extension.iastate.edu/p85891731/

RealPlayer
mms://wms.extension.iastate.edu/video/bioeconomy_10-23-2006.wmv

Duration 1:18:36

Source[http://www.iastate.edu/~nscentral/news/2006/oct/bioforum.shtml]

Tuesday, May 8, 2007

Alternative Crops and Alternative Policies for Bioenergy

The Perspectives on Present and Future Corn-Based Ethanol Industry webcast was presented by Iowa State University (ISU) Extension on Monday, November 13 2006.

[http://www.extension.iastate.edu/webcast/archive06.htm]

Seven ISU economists presented economic information on several aspects of the industry. Links to papers offering additional information on each topic and the PowerPoint each presenter used are available below.

Demand Drivers for Ethanol and Outlook for Prices by John Miranowski, professor, Economics.

PAPER [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/MIranowskiPresent.indd.pdf]

PPT [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/Miranowski.PowerPoint.pdf]

Situation and Outlook for the Ethanol Industry, Paul Gallagher, associate professor, Economics.

PAPER [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/GallagherPresent.indd.pdf]

PPT [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/Gallagher(Rev)PowerPoint.pdf]

Impacts of Iowa’s Rapid Expansion in Corn-based Ethanol Production on Crop Acreage Needs, Grain Prices, Basis Behavior and Distillers Grain Supplies by Robert Wisner, professor, Economics and Extension economist.

PAPER [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/WisnerPresent.indd.pdf]

PPT [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/WisnerPowerPoint.pdf]

A Firm Level of Perspective on Ethanol Expansion by Robert Jolly, professor, Economics and Extension economist.

PAPER [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/JollyPresent.indd.pdf]

PPT [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/BobJollyPowerPoint.pdf]

The Long-Run Impact of Corn-Based Ethanol on the Grain, Oilseed, and Livestock Sectors: A Preliminary Assessment by Amani El Obeid associate scientist, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development.

PAPER [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/AmaniPresent.indd.pdf]

PPT [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/ElobeidFinalPowerPoint.pdf]

Expansion In The Ethanol Industry And Its Effects On The Livestock Industry by John Lawrence, professor, Economics and director, Iowa Beef Center.

PAPER [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/LawrencePresent.indd.pdf]

PPT [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/LawrencePowerPoint.pdf]

Potential Infrastructure Constraints on Ethanol Production in Iowa by Roger Ginder, professor, Economics and Extension economist.

PAPER [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/GinderPresent.indd.pdf]

PPT [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/RogerGinderPowerPoint.pdf]

SOURCE [http://www.extension.iastate.edu/ag/ethanol.html]

Sunday, May 6, 2007

Dennis Keeney: Ethanol's Power Politics

Dennis Keeney, Senior Fellow at the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, and former director of the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, was interviewed by Ben Kieffer, host of The Exchange on Iowa Public Radio, on May 5 2007.

[http://www.iatp.org/]

[http://www.leopold.iastate.edu/]

[http://wsui.uiowa.edu/exchange.htm]

Ethanol's Power Politics: Potential Social and Environmental Outcomes

RealPlayer [http://tinyurl.com/26vdhn]
Podcast [http://tinyurl.com/26d5oa

Related Presentation

Ethanol’s Power Politics: Potential Social and Environmental Outcomes

Iowa State University, Environmental Science Seminar, Monday, February 12 2007.

Abstract
Ethanol production using corn grain has exploded in the Upper Midwest. This has caught many planners unawares. Issues such as the availability of grain, transportation infrastructure, effect on other uses of grain such as poultry and swine, and even the ability to meet export contracts are being questioned. Short term outcomes of the biofuels policies include rapidly expanding acreage of corn at the expense of soybean and conservation reserve land and added stress on the region’s land and water resources.

Lost until recently in the whirlwind has been the potential impact of ethanol plants on natural resources, including water availability, water quality, biodiversity and farm structure. Each gallon of ethanol involves the loss of about 20 pounds of soil. Use of nitrogen fertilizer will increase as more land is put into corn, and if CRP is taken out of contract for more corn, loss of biodiversity will surely follow.

Ethanol production has the potential for economic and social upheavals as well.

[more]

[http://www.ensci.iastate.edu/grad/DK_abstract.pdf]

PDF/PowerPoint slides available at
[http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gerrymck/DKeeney.pdf]

PDF/PowerPoint slides for similar presentation at the University of Iowa, May 4 2007.
[http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gerrymck/DKeeney2.pdf]

I am very grateful to Dennis Kenney for providing the presentation and for permission to upload. I also wish to thank Bill and Karen Stansbery for the HeadsUp on The Exchange interview.

Launch of the Bioeconomy Blog

The Bioeconomy Blog is a devoted to the identification and promotion of key primary and secondary literature relating to biorenewable fuels, most notably bioethanol and biodiesel.

It will seek to identify all significant literature and presentations relating to the economic, environmental, political, and social aspects of biofuel initiatives.

With proper support, it is hoped that the major publications and presentations cited in The Bioenergy Blog will be compiled into a Web-based annotated bibliography.

The Bioeconomy Blog was formally established on May 6 2007.